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Lemur photo..

The altruistic side of aggressive greed

In many group-living species, high-rank individuals bully their group-mates to get what they want, but their contribution is key to success in conflict with other groups, according to a study that sheds new light on the evolutionary roots of cooperation and group conflict. In a series of mathematical models, researchers from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and the University of Oxford uncovered a mechanism for explaining how between-group conflict influences within-group cooperation and how genes for this behavior might be maintained in the population by natural selection. Read the full story.

Citation: Gavrilets S, Fortunato L. 2014. A solution to the collective action problem in between-group conflict with within-group inequality. Nature Communications. [Open access online]  


Dandelion photo.
Credit:
Simon Uribe-Convers

Coping with the cold: Study offers clues to how plants evolved in icy climates

Researchers have found new clues to how plants evolved to withstand wintry weather. In a study, which appeared December 22 in the journal Nature, researchers constructed an evolutionary tree of more than 32,000 species of flowering plants — the largest time-scaled evolutionary tree to date. Combining their evolutionary tree with freezing exposure records and leaf and stem data for thousands of species, the researchers were able to reconstruct how plants evolved to cope with cold as they spread across the globe. Read the full story.

Citation: Zanne, A., et al. 2013. Three keys to the radiation of angiosperms into freezing environments. Nature. [Online]  


Dolphin photo.

Name that tune

The same algorithm used to find tunes in music retrieval systems has been successfully applied in identifying the signature whistles of dolphins, affording a new time-saving device for research into the world of dolphin communication. A study, published Oct. 23 in the journal PLOS ONE, describes a new method. Read the full story.

Citation: Kershenbaum A, Sayigh LS, Janik VM. 2013. The encoding of individual identity in dolphin signature whistles: how much information is needed? PLOS ONE. [Online]  


Turtle photo.

Climate change threatens Northern American turtle habitat

Although a turtle's home may be on its back, some North American turtles face an uncertain future as a warming climate threatens to reduce their suitable habitat. A new study that reconstructs the effects of past climatic changes on 59 species of North American turtles finds that the centers of the turtles’ ranges shifted an average of 45 miles for each degree of warming or cooling. While some species were able to find widespread suitable climate, other species, many of which today are endangered, were left with only minimal habitat. Read the full story.

Citation: Rödder D, Lawing AM, Flecks M, Ahmadzadeh F, Dambach J, Engler JO, Habel JC, Hartmann T, Hörnes D, Ihlow F, Schiedelko K, Stiels D, Polly DP. 2013. Evaluating the significance of paleophylogeographic species distribution models in reconstructing quaternary range-shifts of Nearctic Chelonians. PLOS ONE. [Online]  


Mongol photo.

Mathematical model explains how complex societies emerge, collapse

The instability of large, complex societies is a predictable phenomenon, according to a new mathematical model that explores the emergence of early human societies via warfare. Capturing hundreds of years of human history, the model reveals the dynamical nature of societies, which can be difficult to uncover in archaeological data. Read the full story.

Citation: Turchin P, Currie T, Turner E, Gavrilets S. 2013. War, space, and the evolution of Old World complex societies. PNAS. [Online]  


R. Ostfeld

How Will Climate Change Affect the Spread of Disease?

At NIMBioS, a group of disease experts, climate modelers and mathematicians have come together to improve the forecasting and prediction of climate-induced disease. Will the entire planet be engulfed in a malarial zone, as some models say, or will there be no net increase of malaria? Find out more in this interview with disease ecologist Dr. Richard Ostfeld.
(NIMBioS video: 6 min 16 sec) Dec 6, 2013

 

NIMBioS bldg.

NIMBioS Wins $18 Million Renewal Award from National Science Foundation

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $18.6 million to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, for the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) to continue its interdisciplinary efforts in developing new mathematical approaches to problems across biology, from the level of the genome to individuals to entire ecosystems. Click here to read more.

 

C. Remien photo.

Animals, Nutrients and Toxins

Dr. Chris Remien is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Dr. Remien develops dynamic mathematical models to understand the role of diet and metabolism on stable isotope ratios of animal tissues.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 00 sec) Jun 21, 2013

 

R. Martin photo.

Selection in the Wild

Dr. Ryan Martin is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). As an evolutionary ecologist, Dr. Martin studies how aspects of the environment can cause evolution through natural selection in wild populations.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 24 sec) Jun 20, 2013

 

J. Beaulieu photo.

New Models in the Tree of Life

Dr. Jeremy Beaulieu is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Dr. Beaulieu is developing a new set of ancestral state reconstruction methods that make more realistic assumptions about how characters evolve across very large phylogenies.
(NIMBioS video: 1 min 43 sec) Jun 19, 2013

 

K. Mack photo.

The Evolution of Cooperation

Dr. Keenan Mack is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Dr. Mack studies the costs and benefits involved in the evolution of cooperation.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 19 sec) Jun 18, 2013

 

A. Kershenbaum photo.

Talking to the Animals

Dr. Arik Kershenbaum is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Dr. Kershenbaum studies the mathematical structure of animal vocal communication and how it evolved into human language.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 07 sec) Jun 17, 2013

 

J. Jiang photo.

Climate Change and Coastal Vegetation

Dr. Jiang Jiang is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Dr. Jiang develops models to help predict and detect the consequences of storm surges on coastal vegetation.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 05 sec) Jun 13, 2013

 

J. Earl photo.

Movement Ecology

Dr. Julia Earl is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Dr. Earl studies the resources that animals, particularly pond-breeding amphibians, move from one ecosystem to another.
(NIMBioS video: 3 min 05 sec) Jun 12, 2013

 

A. ilany photo.

Animal Networks

Dr. Amiyaal Ilany is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Dr. Ilany studies the spotted hyena in order to understand the causes and consequences of social network dynamics.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 50 sec) Jun 11, 2013

 

M. Lawing photo.

Species and Climate Change

Dr. Michelle Lawing is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Dr. Lawing uses methods from the biological and geological sciences to study how species respond to climate change.
(NIMBioS video: 1 min 32 sec) May 31, 2013

 

O. Gaoue photo.

Wild Plant Harvesting

Dr. Orou Gaoue is a postdoctoral fellow at NIMBioS. He seeks to understand the global sustainability of harvesting wild plants.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 40 sec) Aug 15, 2012

 

A. Kanarek photo.

The Dynamics of Small Populations

Dr. Andrew Kanarek is a postdoctoral fellow at NIMBioS. He investigates how individual trait variation influences the dynamics and persistence of small populations.
(NIMBioS video: 1 min 51 sec) Jul 3, 2012

 

D. Ryan photo.

Measures of Movement

Dr. Daniel Ryan is a postdoctoral fellow at NIMBioS. Dr. Ryan uses mathematical models to investigate how movement affects the way species are distributed in time and space.
(NIMBioS video: 4 min 48 sec) Jun 28, 2012

 

G. Magombedze photo.

Helping the Dairy Cow

Dr. Gesham Magombedze is a postdoctoral fellow at NIMBioS. Dr. Magombedze is modeling solutions to treat and control the spread of Johne's disease in cattle.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 40 sec) Jun 25, 2012

 

JJ Chai photo.

Parsimony in Phylogenetics

Dr. Juanjuan "JJ" Chai is a postdoctoral fellow at NIMBioS. Dr. Chai is helping to solve problems related to research methods used in phylogenetics.
(NIMBioS video: 4 min 23 sec) Jun 22, 2012

 

C. ngonghala photo.

The Dynamics of Malaria

Dr. Calistus Ngonghala is a postdoctoral fellow at NIMBioS. Dr. Ngonghala is developing a mathematical model to study the role of mosquito demography in the dynamics of malaria transmission. He also studies the interplay between poverty and disease.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 46 sec) Jun 19, 2012

 

M. Lelu photo.

Parasite Ecology

Dr. Maud Lélu is a postdoctoral fellow at NIMBioS. She investigates the interactions between parasites, their hosts and the environment and more specifically focuses on the genetic diversity and virulence of Toxoplasma gondii.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 09 sec) Jun 19, 2012

 

D. Schimel photo.

Dr. David Schimel

In an interview at NIMBioS, Dr. David Schimel, chief science officer and principal investigator at the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), explains why math is essential in environmental biology and why it matters to the work of NEON.
(NIMBioS video: 8 min 18 sec) Mar 12, 2012

 

L. Ginzburg photo.

Dr. Lev Ginzburg

In a video interview at NIMBioS, Dr. Lev Ginzburg, a professor of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University, explains how his company, Applied Biomathematics, got its start 30 years ago. Dr. Ginzburg visited NIMBioS in February 2012.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 56 sec)

 

Debate photo.

The Noes Have It

NIMBioS hosted a lively debate on the role of warfare in early social evolution. The debate, held Feb. 8, 2012, in the University of Tennessee's (UT) University Center, was designed to raise questions about how science can explain the transition from simple to complex societies.

 

J. Sabloff photo.

Dr. Jeremy Sabloff

Dr. Jeremy Sabloff, president of the Santa Fe Institute (SFI), explains how SFI researchers have used biological laws to understand the nature of cities. Dr. Sabloff, an anthropologist, is a participant in the NIMBioS Investigative Workshop on Modeling Social Complexity.
(NIMBioS video: 4 min 27 sec)

 

REU photo.

Summer Research for Undergrads

For eight weeks each summer, undergraduates in math, biology and related fields work on teams to conduct original research at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), located at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. For more information, visit our website at http://www.nimbios.org/education/reu.
(NIMBioS video: 6 min 08 sec)

 

T. Gilman photo.

Math for Frogs: NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Tucker Gilman

Video interview with Dr. Tucker Gilman, a NIMBioS postdoctoral fellow whose research may may help us predict how ecosystems will respond to man-made disturbances.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 38 sec)

 

T. Jhwueng photo.

New Tools for Phylogenetics: NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Tony Jhwueng

Video interview with Dr. Tony Jhwueng, a postdoctoral fellow at NIMBioS who designs new phylogenetic methods for comparative analysis under non-tree-like evolution.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 29 sec)

 

S. Edwards photo.

NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Scott Edwards

In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, Dr. Scott Edwards, professor of organismic and evolutionary biology at Harvard University, explains why mathematical biology has become a workhorse in science.
(NIMBioS video: 4 min 16 sec)

 

J. Arciero photo.

NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Julia Arciero

In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, Dr. Julia Arciero, an assistant professor of mathematics at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, explains how mathematical biology has applications to all other areas of science.
(NIMBioS video: 5 min 35 sec)

 

D. Thomas photo.

NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Diana Thomas

In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, Dr. Diana Thomas, an associate professor of mathematics at Montclair State University, explains how mathematical models can be used to help curb the obesity epidemic.
(NIMBioS video: 2 min 39 sec)

 

A. Layton photo.

NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Anita Layton

In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, Dr. Anita Layton, an assistant professor of mathematics at Duke University, explains how mathematics is useful in understanding how the kidney works.
(NIMBioS video: 7 min 4 sec)

 

Biology photo.

Biology in a Box

Biology in a Box is a fun, hands-on way for students from kindergarten to 12th grade to learn about the wonders of the natural world, while also learning the scientific methods and math skills needed to understand that world. For more information about how to enroll in the program for your school, visit http://www.nimbios.org/biologyinabox
(NIMBioS video: 4 min 16 sec)

 

V. Kapur photo.

NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Vivek Kapur

In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBIoS), Dr. Vivek Kapur, professor and head of veterinary and biomedical sciences at Penn State University, describes how mathematics can help clarify the chaotic science of biology. Dr. Kapur was a participant in the NIMBioS Investigative Workshop on Modeling Johne's Disease held July 6-8, 2011, at NIMBioS.
(NIMBioS video: 6 min 18 sec)

 

T. Ingersoll photo.

NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Tom Ingersoll

Dr. Tom Ingersoll is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). He is developing dispersal and dynamic models for the spread of white nose syndrome in bats. (NIMBioS video: 4 min 30 sec)

 

E. Moran photo.

Changing Forests: NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Emily Moran

Dr. Emily Moran is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). She investigates the impact of increasing CO2 on inter-genotype competition and plant-insect interactions in aspen forests in order to develop a modeling framework that could be applied to other forest communities. (NIMBioS video: 2 min 56 sec)

 

Ogundahunsi photo.

The Mathematics of Malaria, Dr. Olumide Ogundahunsi

Dr. Olumide Ogundahunsi is with the Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases at the World Health Organization. In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBIoS), Dr. Ogundahunsi explains how mathematical modeling can help in the fight against malaria, a disease that claimed nearly one million lives in 2008. Dr. Ogundahunsi was a participant in the NIMBioS Investigative Workshop on Malaria Modeling and Control held June 15-17, 2011, at NIMBioS. The views expressed by Dr. Ogundahunsi are not necessarily representative of the views of the WHO. (NIMBioS video: 4 min 22 sec)


Volker Grimm photo.

NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Volker Grimm

In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBIoS), Dr. Volker Grimm of the Helmholz Center for Environmental Research in Germany explains why math is absolutely critical to solving today's pressing ecological problems. (NIMBioS video: 3 min 07 sec)

 

Hemlock photo.

The Blight of the Hemlock

NIMBioS Songwriter-in-Residence Jay Clark debuts his song, The Day the Last Hemlock Died, which tells the story of the blight of the Eastern Hemlocks in Southern Appalachia. The song ends with a short refrain, a note of optimism, from Aaron Copland's "Appalachian Spring." For more information about the songwriter-in-residence program, visit http://www.nimbios.org/songwriter. For more information about how to help save the hemlocks, visit http://www.savinghemlocks.org/. (NIMBioS video: 6 min 17 sec)

 

Timothy Sellers photo.

Inspired by Science

In an interview with NIMBioS, singer-songwriter Timothy Sellers explains how science inspires his music. Sellers is lead singer in the Los Angeles-based indie pop band Artichoke. The band has released nine CDs, including a two-volume set of scientist biography songs (NIMBioS video: 2 min 9 sec).

 

RB Morris photo.

Science for the People, RB Morris

NIMBioS Songwriter-in-Residence RB Morris performs his song Science for the People. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 6 min 34 sec)

 

Juliet Pulliam  photo.

NIMBioS Interview with Dr. Juliet Pulliam

In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, Dr. Juliet Pulliam explains how mathematics is used to understand the transmission dynamics of infections transmitted from animals to people, like the monkeypox virus or Nipah virus. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 5 min 02 sec)

 

Guitar photo.

NIMBioS Songwriter-in-Residence

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, in conjunction with the Univ. of Tennessee's James R. Cox Endowment Fund, is sponsoring a Songwriter-in-Residence Program to encourage the creation and production of songs involving ideas of modern biology and the lives of scientists who pursue research in biology. Click here for more information.

 

Maria Siopsis photo.

The Mathematics of Biology

In an interview at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Maryville College Dr. Maria Siopsis explains why mathematics is a critical skill for biology students. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 3 min 39 sec)

 

Armsworth, Bode photo.

Preserving Nature on Land and Sea

At the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, four scientists have gathered from around the world to determine optimal strategies for designing and managing marine and terrestrial reserves. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 6 min 23 sec)

 

William Godsoe photo.

Relationship Between a Species' Niche and Its Distribution

Dr. William Godsoe is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). He uses probability theory to examine relationships between a species' niche and its geographic distribution. For more information about Dr. Godsoe's work, click here. To view the video click here. (NIMBioS video: 3 min 51 sec)

 

lab photo.

Undergrads, Vet Students, Teachers Dive Into Summer Research at NIMBioS

Sixteen students and two high school teachers from 16 different institutions across the United States lived on the university campus and worked in teams with professors on various research projects as a part of NIMBioS' Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) and Research Experiences for Veterinary Students (REV). Click here to read more about it in Knoxville's hometown newspaper.

 

Erol Akcay photo.

Cooperation and Confict

Dr. Erol Akçay is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). He investigates the dynamics of cooperation and conflict in animal social behavior and ecological mutualisms. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 4 min 01 sec)

 

Folashade Agusto photo.

Transmission Dynamics of Infectious Disease

Dr. Folashade Agusto is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). She conducts research involving mathematical analysis and optimal control of transmission dynamics of infectious diseases, focusing specifically on bovine tuberculosis, malaria and avian influenza. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 1 min 53 sec)

 

Xavier Thibert-Plante photo.

Biodiversity in a Changing World

Dr. Xavier Thibert-Plante is a postdoctoral researcher at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). He studies the impact of climate change on biodiversity, specifically the evolution of biodiversity and the process of biodiversification in a changing environment. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 2 min 11 sec)

 

Sharon Bewick photo.

Ants and Climate Change

Dr. Sharon Bewick is a postdoctoral researcher at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). She studies how different ant species interact and how their interactions affect forest plant composition. She focuses particularly on how ant communities might be affected by disturbances in the global climate. For more information about Dr. Bewick's research, click here. To view the video, click here. (NIMBioS video: 2 min 23 sec)

 

Yi Mao photo.

The Evolution of the Protein

Dr. Yi Mao is a postdoctoral researcher at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis. She studies enzymatic protein's role in biological energy production and the physical principles that drive protein evolution. Because the origins of many diseases lie in the malfunction of proteins, a better understanding of how proteins behave could lead to new discoveries in medicine. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 1 min 12 sec)

 

Kerrie Loyd photo.

The Fight of the Feral Cat

Kerrie Anne Loyd is a graduate student at the University of Georgia's Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources and a short-term visitor at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) on the campus of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She is developing a mathematical model to analyze and determine the most efficient way to manage feral cat populations. Click here to view the video. (NIMBioS video: 2 min 23 sec)

 

UBM photo.

2010 NIMBioS/UBM Award Winners Chosen

Nine undergraduate students from across the nation have been selected to receive a 2010 NIMBioS/UBM award to attend the Beyond BIO2010 Celebrations and Opportunities Symposium, May 21-22, in Washington, DC. The conference focuses on initiatives underway at the nation's colleges and universities to transform the way biology is taught at the undergraduate level. The award covers transportation to and from the conference, where students will present their research.

 

Steve Fassino photo.

NIMBioS Undergrad Wins Research Award

Steve Fassino, who participated in the 2009 Research Experiences for Undergraduates at NIMBioS, has won an undergraduate research award from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT). Fassino, a junior majoring in mathematics at UT, won a EURēCA award in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources division.


Photo/Office of Research
 

field photo.

REU/REV Students Chosen

Seventeen students and two high school teachers from 17 different institutions across the United States have been chosen to participate in this year's summer research program at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.

 

Nathan Stebbins photo.

NIMBioS Undergrad Wins Goldwater Scholarship

Nathan Stebbins, a biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology major at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has been named a 2010 Barry M. Goldwater Scholar. Stebbins is currently conducting research on cancer biology as an undergraduate.

 

montage photo.

NIMBioS Congratulates Its Newest Postdocs

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) congratulates its newest postdoctoral fellows, who will begin their research at NIMBioS later this year: R. Tucker Gilman, Tom E. Ingersoll, and Xavier Thibert-Plante.

 

R photo.

New Guidebook Helps Life Scientists Navigate R Statistical Software

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis has released an introductory guide to data analysis using the R system to conduct statistical analysis and techniques widely used in the life sciences. Written by Marco Martinez, a graduate student in the department of mathematics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, R for Biologists was produced as companion material for the R Tutorial for Life Sciences seminar, held in 2009 and co-sponsored by NIMBioS and UT's Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Freely available on the Internet, R offers a variety of statistical and graphical techniques used by life science researchers.

 

AAAS photo.

AAAS Symposium Investigates Math Applications in Biology

Under what conditions does an epidemic spread? What is the optimal way to design an effective HIV intervention plan? How does the human brain work when it makes poor choices? The answers to these questions can be found mathematically, and will be explored in a symposium at this year’s annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, to be held Feb. 18-22 in San Diego.

 

Suzanne Lenhart photo.Cynthia Peterson photo.

NIMBioS Leaders Among 11 UTK Faculty Named AAAS Fellows

NIMBioS leaders Suzanne Lenhart and Cynthia Peterson, were named 2010 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Lenhart is a professor of mathematics at UT and NIMBioS Associate Director for Education, Outreach and Diversity, while Peterson is a professor of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology and NIMBioS Associate Director for Graduate Education. AAAS named 11 UT Knoxville faculty members to the 2010 class of fellows, more new fellows than any other university in the South.

 

Coral reef photo.

Congratulations to the Newest NIMBioS Recipients of Support

The sustainability of coral reef ecosystems and nutrient cycling in food webs are among the topics to be studied in 2010 at NIMBioS. The range of topics to be investigated advance the Institute's mission to foster collaborative efforts to address biological questions using mathematical and computational methods.

 

Guitar photo.

Songwriters, Scientists Put the Pop in Science at BioSongs Project

Todd Steed, R.B. Morris and other local singer-songwriters heard University of Tennessee, Knoxville scientists talk about their research at an all-day songwriting workshop on Wednesday, Oct. 14 at NIMBioS on the UT Knoxville campus. The NIMBioS BioSongs Project brought together singer-songwriters and UT biologists and mathematicians to share stories about research and about the people who do it, with the goal of sparking ideas for songs about modern biology.

 

Piechart.

NIMBioS Celebrates First Year with More Than 400 Participants

NIMBioS celebrated its one-year anniversary in September, and thus far, more than 400 individuals from 15 countries and 43 states have participated in various research and educational activities.Located on the campus of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, NIMBioS focuses on advancing research and education at the interface of biology and mathematics. Programs for visitors to NIMBioS began in March 2009, including working groups, investigative workshops, tutorials, and educational opportunities.